Cottars 1920’s Camp

Name of the facilityCottars 1920’s Camp
Certification AchievedGold
Year opened1998
Tourism regionNorth Rift
CountyNarok
AddressNairobi
Map It
Telephone/Mobile733773378
Email[email protected]
Websitecottars.com
Facility NotesCottars 1920’s Camp is located in Olderikesi Group Ranch, which lies to the south east of the Maasai Mara National Reserve adjoining the Serengeti. It is specifically located on GPS coordinates latitude 36M 0760338 and longitude UTM 98099858. It was opened in 1998. The camp has 11 guest tents and one cottage with a bed capacity of 28 and a total workforce of 80 employees. It is open all year round.
Olderikesi Group Ranch lies to the south east of the Maasai Mara National Reserve adjoining the Serengeti. The Olderikesi Group Ranch is an integral part of the Mara-Serengeti ecosystem, providing critical wildlife dispersal area for migratory wildlife. In September 2006, the Cottars 1920’s Camp initiated Cottar’s Wildlife Conservation Trust (CWCT) for wildlife conservation, support human development and promote nature conservation. In this regard, CWCT and the local land owners are working to establish a 6,000 acre Olderikesi Wildlife Conservancy by assisting the Maasai landowners acquire land titles.
Energy managementCottars Camp is entirely powered by solar energy fixed with power inverter battery system. It has 32 solar panels. The power is used for lighting, and running refrigerants. There are two (2) backup generators each with 14 KvA and 33 KvA respectively. They run for approximately 8hours per day.
A meter has been installed to monitor power at source and energy consumption is recorded. The system is fixed with main switches for power rationing at departmental levels. Circuit breaks are installed to control power consumption. In addition, low wattage energy saving bulbs is fixed throughout the premises while main switches are easily accessible in all the guest tents to conserve power. Translucent windows are fitted within the guest kitchen for natural lighting.
Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is used for cooking throughout the camp. In addition, the gas is also used to heat for guests. Further, the facility has also invested in three (3) solar water heaters with a capacity of 300 liters. They are specifically used to heat water at the Cottage. Water for staff quarter is heated through one (1) main kuni-boiler. In total the camp has (5) kuni boilers. The system uses dead fuel wood collected from the group ranch.
Guests are briefed on energy conservation upon arrival whereas employees are sensitized during departmental meetings. Sensitization signs on energy saving are fixed in the main consumption points.
Environmental managementCottars 1920’s Camp has a comprehensive environmental policy that is committed to being proactive in the quest for pollution prevention, protecting the ecosystem and natural resources, community empowerment, compliance with relevant environmental legislation and maintaining quality services to its guests.
The facility has also has a detailed environmental management system with clear management plans in water, energy, and waste management. In addition, are clear eenvironmental goals which include:
• efficiency in water and energy use
• responsible waste management
• compliance with legislations
• sensitization of staff and clients
• expansion of ecosystem area under management
• Monitoring and continued improvement of the set environmental targets.
Chemical useDiesel is stored in an underground tank of 4,000 litres. Paraffin is stored in four (4) tanks each with 250 liters. The storage is contained in a non –porous, bunded structure to prevent accidental spillage. Liquefied Petroleum Gas is stored in bulk 2 tone cylinder. 12kg and 50kg cylinders are refilled from main tanks specifically for water heating purposes.
The facility uses environmental friendly Diversy Limited washing detergents. Biodegradable Ecover washing chemicals are used for kitchen and general cleaning purposes.
The swimming pool is managed / serviced by Davis & Shirtliff. The chemicals are supplied by the same company. Material Safety Data Sheet records for the chemicals are available.
Conservation Criteria
Community Criteria
Solid waste managementThe facility has a waste disposal policy and management plan. Recording of waste produced (types & quantity) is done for monitoring purposes.
The camp has ‘no plastics’ policy. It has invested in a Reverse Osmosis water filtration plant and makes use of re-usable branded glass bottles for domestic (drinking) purposes. This has immensely reduced on plastic waste.
Waste separation (paper, plastics, metals and glass) is conducted at source and the bins are clearly labeled and colour coded. The waste is further separated at the waste holding area. The organic waste is composted for use at the kitchen garden. Tetra-packs are used for rearing indigenous tree seedlings within the camp.
Plastic, glass, metallic and electronic waste is disposed to recycling firms through Cottars Camps central office in Nairobi. The Camp has a contract with Environmental and Combustion Consultants Limited who collects the waste.
Water managementMain water source for Cottars 1920’s camp is a natural spring located within the premises. The water is collected in an underground tank and pumped on a high elevation for supply through gravity to the entire premises. It is stored in six (6) reservoir tanks; four (4) of 10,000 litres each and two (2) of 5,000 litres each. A water mater has been fitted at the main outlet. Water monitoring is conducted through recording. The facility has scaled up use of rain water harvesting. Currently it has a capacity of collecting 50,000 litres when full.
The camp has a water extraction Permit from (WRMA) Water Resources Management Authority in compliance with section 25 in the Water Act 2002.
Initiatives employed to reduce on water usage include;
• Use of drip irrigation at the kitchen gardens
• Sensitizing visitors on water conservation during arrival briefings. Sensitization information and signage is also availed in the tents and major water user points.
• “Towel talk” cards encouraging guests on the re-use of towels to conserve water are placed within the guest tents.
• Use of water efficient technology including low filter shower heads, lift taps and dual flush toilet cisterns are installed at the main cottage. Press taps are fixed in the main water user point such as the staff quarters wash area.
Cottars Camp is entirely powered by solar energy fixed with power inverter battery system. It has 32 solar panels. The power is used for lighting, and running refrigerants. There are two (2) backup generators each with 14 KvA and 33 KvA respectively. They run for approximately 8hours per day.
A meter has been installed to monitor power at source and energy consumption is recorded. The system is fixed with main switches for power rationing at departmental levels. Circuit breaks are installed to control power consumption. In addition, low wattage energy saving bulbs is fixed throughout the premises while main switches are easily accessible in all the guest tents to conserve power. Translucent windows are fitted within the guest kitchen for natural lighting.
Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is used for cooking throughout the camp. In addition, the gas is also used to heat for guests. Further, the facility has also invested in three (3) solar water heaters with a capacity of 300 liters. They are specifically used to heat water at the Cottage. Water for staff quarter is heated through one (1) main kuni-boiler. In total the camp has (5) kuni boilers. The system uses dead fuel wood collected from the group ranch.
Guests are briefed on energy conservation upon arrival whereas employees are sensitized during departmental meetings. Sensitization signs on energy saving are fixed in the main consumption points.
Visitor communication & educationThe camp has a reading resource area located at the restaurant with information materials on Birds, mammals and Cottars Safari Camp History.
The visitors are briefed upon arrival. Room information sheets are also provided in the guest tents with detailed information on Cottar’s Camp History, environmental conservation and camps activities. Room information packs also contain information on the Maasai Mara ecosystem and the Conservancy.
PollutionA carwash has been constructed with an effective drainage system. Oil interceptor has been installed to trap any oil leaks. The filtered effluent drains in a wetland system.
Lanterns are used to illuminate the pathways at night to reduce on light pollution. The facility two generators are fitted with sound reducing devices.
Environmental conservationCottars 1920’s Camp is built on low environmental footprint and blends well with the local surroundings. The guest tents are made out of canvas raised on sand and gravel earth. Materials used are of natural colors green, and beige. Though, permanent the staff quarters roofing is painted green and blend well with the environment. The facility is unfenced which allows wildlife to move freely. Footpaths are left natural with gravel to demarcate way.
On weekly basis, the camp has set an environmental day aimed at staff awareness and sensitization. In addition, guests are encouraged to participate in low impact activities such as guided nature walks, hiking activities, back-house tour, bird watching and local community village visits.
Through Cottars Wildlife Conservation Trust (CWCT) – a charitable trust for promotion of wildlife, support for human development and nature conservation –the facility promotes conservation of 7,000 acres of community land in Olderikesi and contributes, lease fees and bed night fee. Additionally, the facility pays 15 community game scouts and a community liaison officer to help in wildlife monitoring (reports on sightings – location) / anti-poaching patrols and to reduce human wildlife conflicts.
The camp partners and support efforts with the Mara Conservancies and Kenya Wildlife Service on collating information through wildlife monitoring initiatives. In addition it has established a linkage with Mara Cheetah Project aimed at research data collection and guests’ sensitization.
Waste water managementThe facility has a clear site drainage plan that assist to monitor the waste water system. The waste water plan consists of septic tanks for sludge digestion, manholes for monitoring and a wetland system.
Grey water from the guest kitchen is managed through a grease trap compartment before draining into a soak pit.
Black water is collected in septic’s for sludge digestion before flowing into a wetland waste water treatment system. The grey (staff, guests etc.) effluent on the other hand flows directly into the treatment system.
The two swimming pools within the facility are cleaned through filtering, scrubbing and backwashing. Backwash is conducted every three days depending on pool use.
Purchasing and suppliesVegetables and fruits are packed in reusable crates while meat and dairy products are stored in cool boxes Dry goods such as flour, rice, sugar are bought in bulk.
Employment and remuneration/staff welfareStaff benefits include; sponsored training, service charges, health care, insurance covers, uniform, food, entertainment, accommodation and transport.
The camp has a staff committee which represents staff issues to the management. The employees are registered under KUDHEIHA (Kenya Union of Domestic, Hotels, Education Institutions, Hospitals and Allied Workers).
Staff education, communication and awareness trainingThe camp has 6 guides who are certified under the Kenya Professional Safari Guides Association: (KPSGA) and 2 Gold, & 3 Silver and 1 Bronze certified. The camp sends its staff for refresher training at Kenya Utalii College.
The facility has a Lobster Ink training program designated for its staff. Lobster Ink is an online hospitality education system that educates staff and management within the hospitality industry on international accepted standards and product knowledge. Further other in-house training programs are conducted. Employees are trained on health and safety, hygiene and housekeeping.
The facility has strategically fixed notice boards for staff communication. Environmental management plan, mission statement and health and safe are clearly pinned on the notice board.
Employees are sensitized and briefed during departmental/daily meetings. A weekly staff meeting is also held.
Cultural preservation and promotion/protection of local sitesThe facility has a curio shop; the selling prices are determined by the local suppliers. Guests also purchase the beadwork directly from the locals during village visits.
Village visits are offered to willing guests to sensitize them on the local culture. The guests are sensitized on the local Maasai culture. Guests are charged $20 per person for the visits and all the proceeds go to the local villagers. The camp has developed a Maasai cultural guide for the visitors.
Benefits to local community/community empowermentCottars purchases locally where possible, perishables such as potatoes, are bought from Oloolomuita market.
Approximately 50% of the employees are from the local area. In addition all casual work opportunities are given to the local people.
The facility contributes monthly payments as lease and bed night fee. Some of the monies are used for community empowerment projects.
Cottar’s 1920 community projects and initiatives are done through CWTC (Cottars Wildlife Conservation Trust). The initiatives include;
• Education: Supports Olpalagilagi primary school through paying for 5 (five) teachers in the school (approximately Kshs. 50,000 used on monthly basis) and running the school lunch feeding program – Olpalagilagi has approximately 250; Further sponsors 28 school going children at Siana Boarding school; Sponsors two (2) in high school and supports two (2) local guides at KPSGA. In addition, the facility assisted in fencing the school
• Medical: Supplies emergency response vehicles to assist the locals and supports Oloolomuita clinic through supply of drugs.
• Water: CWTC has supplied water through piping to the nearby Olpalagilagi Primary School. The water is also used by the nearby community. In addition, the camp has ensured the water meets drinking standards through installation of a filtration and treatment system. Maintenance of the system is routinely done and monitored by the camp.
The camp is a member of “Pack for a Purpose” initiative where visitors are encouraged to donate items that may be of need in their areas of travel.
Cultural Criteria
Health and safetyCottar’s 1920 Camp has documented Emergency Procedures and guidelines on fire, bites, stings, ailments, robbery, fire etc. A copy is kept by all head of departments. Additionally, the guest tents have a sketch map illustrating nearest fire assembly
Verified records showed medical checkups are conducted to the food and beverage handlers to comply with Food, Drugs, and Chemical substances Act. Cap 254.
The camp has an adequate team of 13 trained first aiders evenly distributed in main departments. Additionally, all guides are well trained on first aid skills. Validated documents revealed the camp has an adequate and conversant team of 31 trained fire marshals. The camp has a well-equipped first aid kit at main office and major departments
The guest tents are equipped with radio calls, whistle, for emergency while the camp is linked to flying doctors for emergency response. Medical care emergencies for guests and staff are referred to Oloolomuita Clinic; however, the management has contacts for the doctor in charge.
Fire fighting equipment such as fire extinguishers and fire blanket in the kitchen are strategically serviced and located. (Latest servicing of the fire extinguishers done in November 2016) Sand buckets are issued to compliment the fire extinguishers.
A fire alarm is available and fire assembly point is properly marked and displayed within the premises. Precautionary and safety signage are well fixed in the fuel and gas storage sections. Proper housekeeping (clean, tidy and dry) was observed at the workshop area. The staff is provided with PPE (Personal Protective Equipment.) e.g. gloves, working aprons, boots etc.
Child labor, abuse and human rightsThe camp has well defined Human Resource policy that guides against employment of minors. Minimum employment age is 18years.
Business Practises Criteria
Entry Date9th November 2017
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